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mark on american law in his 33 years on the bench, but his greatest contribution is is renowned commentaries on the constitution. justice story a famously and correctly declared "a constitutional government is addressed to the common sense of the people and never was designed for trials of logical skills or visionary speculation." this lecture series celebrates his legacy in the law. prior lectures have been judge robert bork, professor john harrison, judge raymond randolph, and chief justice of the united states court of appeals of the sixth circuit. tonight, we're honored to add a fifth name to that prestigious list as a welcome justice anthony kennedy. justice kennedy received his bachelor of arts degree from stanford university and the london school of economics and his law degree from harvard law school. prior to this public service, the justice served in private practice in san francisco and sacramento. i can attest to his prowess as an attorney because on one very interesting occasion, he represented me. [laughter] on a speeding ticket. [laughter] and got me off with a mi
the most expensive election of all time. >> we're here on the campus of ucla law school where they debate constitutional issues. today they're doing a convention on money out and voters in. >> and we have our elbow of the day later. jr jackson is going to love this. tweet us at tyt on current if you can guess who it is. zisko>>>el granada is a special place to learn because we have a dedicated community and a dedicated staff. and when kids come on campus everyday, they're enthusiasm for learning shines. we receive federal funding because a majority of our students are socially disadvantaged. making sure our students receive healthy nutritious lunches and breakfasts is critical to their learning. i would like to see students take more ownership of what they eat everyday and learn about their bodies and how their food nourishes them. sandra jonaidi>>> i hope that we get them early enough that they've learn some good eating habits and they go forward and become very productive humans and grow up to make us all proud of them. narrator>> for more info, go to curren
of ucla law school where they argue constitution. today they're discussing money out, voters in. >> and jayar jackson will love this. tweet us on @tytoncurrent if you can guess who it is. before the cold & flu season help prevent with lysol. because when you have 10 times more protection with each hand wash... and kill 99.9% of germs around the house with each spray... those healthy habits start to add up. this season, a good offense is the best defense and lysol has your family covered because that's our mission for health. >> it's no secret to regular viewers of this show that cenk has long been passionate, unbelievably passionate about campaign finance reform. this past weekend at ucla law school, he was invited to participate in a conference called money out voters in. let's take a look at how that worked out. >> cenk: we're here on the campus of ucla law school. where they debate constitutional issues. today they're doing a convention on money out voters in. the issue of getting money out of politics. they'll be discussing the pr
the law and didn't do their job for the american people and it's the president that hasn't led this country and come up with a plan for the american people. jay carney might say hey, listen, we've got a plan and this is the plan. well then share the plan with the american people. then we can get somewhere in this country and we can actually tackle the spending and debt that's going to bankrupt us all. >> reince, if the plan is exactly as he has stated here, and it includes some tax increases as the vast majority, nearly two thirds, more than two thirds of the american public want, actually want, if that is on the table, why wouldn't the republicans sign up to it? >> listen, i don't know the details of what he's offering, piers. i'm not trying to hide behind any of it. i just can't actually have an intelligent conversation about a plan hypothetically that we haven't seen, that might include tax increases and might not and might include some deduction loophole eliminations that we haven't seen. how can you have an intelligent conversation like this? you actually have to see a pla
the fiscal cliff coming on january 1st, more of the president's health care law is starting to kick l log on to foxnews.com. ♪ >> well, the election is over and the white house is putting out new rules for the health care law, one is telling how to reward workers for living a healthier life. so, ben, you know what? let's put aside the worry that this is going to drive up cost? isn't this more of the nancy state nonsense? >> big brother is watching you, big brother is watching you through the obama white house, through the department of health and human services and transmit that to the job and also to your employer. i don't like it. i don't want big brother watching me and telling me how much to eat or when to walk or whether or not to smoke, i like to live my own life, and i'm a grownup. i had my mother telling me what to to eat when i'm a child, i'm done with that, i don't want mr. obama to be my mother. >> and i listen to my mommy and calls me and tells me to eat more veggies i will, but i draw the line there. julian, i think it's part of that social utopia coming out of washington
, the nine justices that occupy its chambers carry a heavy responsibility. they have the final say on the law of the land. the principles and idea that guide their decisions are the subject of heated debate. justice antonin scalia is the longest serving justice currently on the court, he is the leading voice for a conservative judicial philosophy known as textualism, some talk about it as originalism. it asserts that laws must be interpreted as they were understood by the men who wrote them. in 2006, justice elena kagan, then the dean of hear extraordinary law school, scalia's alma mater says he is the justice who has had the most important impact over the years on how we think and talk about law. he originally coauthored a new book, it is called reading law, the interpretation of legal text. i am very honored to have justice scalia back on this program. so the first book was about arguing, how to make the case arguing the case. this is called reading law, the interpretation of legal text written brian a. garner -- >> as the earlier book was. >> rose: exactly. so what did you hope to accompl
obama's health care law. >> the health care law. >> the signature achievement of barack obama's presidency. >> now they're trying to drag it into the negotiations over the fiscal cliff. >> we have a new message from congressman boehner. >> we can't afford it, we can't afford it and we can't afford to leave it in tact. that's not a new message. >> can you say it was done openly? >> that is not a new message. >> they have been defeated three times. >> we had an election. >> the american people have spoken. >> elections have consequences. >> we're not going to change anybody's mind. >> they need to move on. >> we had an election and they lost. >> i want to thank everyone who participated in this election. >> the presidential pardon. >> the winning turkey can thank his stellar campaign team. >> turkey pardon at the white house. >> these birds are moving forward. >> a very happy thanksgiving. >> a very happy thanksgiving. >> happy thanksgiving. >> and happy thanksgiving. presidential campaigns, they usually focus on, well, you might say hope and change. the candidates promise big g
? >> it would be much larger constituency about creating that device. >> beyond that, law enforcement has other techniques. they do not need a special device. there is still reckless driving on the books, the power of the nation -- of observation and other evidence that can be relied upon. the same outcome to restrict -- >> can odor be introduced as evidence? rex the officers perception of an odor can. some potential evidence. >> talking about regulating the illegal drugs, they mentioned that 80% of the position painkillers in the world are sold in the united states. five percent of the population of the world's 80% of the world's painkillers. drug related overdoses for death -- close to 70% were from prescription drugs. even the drugs that we regulate -- we do not seem to be doing too good of a drug -- of a job at a lot of people are dying to reque. >> we would not have any car fatalities if there were no cars. i do not need to make light of what you're saying but the fact that failure of the peace and not condemn the value that exists for these other off -- these other. this brings up a large
the court would take would take up the case and that was really quite important in terms of how our law developed in a relationship between the judicial review, the ability of the court to examine an act of kindness and strike it down as unconstitutional. we take it for granted, the modern court has done that with some frequency and of course was asked to do it this spring in the health care case. well, you know john marshall famously declared that it was the power and the duty of the court to say what the law is and that was the expression of his understanding, but the power of judicial review is inherent in our constitutional system and that was not self-evident at all. so that is the power of jurisdiction. limits on jurisdiction that somebody has to have standing and all the doctrines that limits jurisdiction, that is not something the court basically made up another courts don't necessarily have that. a few years ago i took a very interesting judicial trip to south africa which have the fabulous constitution, modern constitution and a wonderful supreme court. the south african const
and probably law enforcement to remember is that social media platforms whatever it is and you name it -- what? a million apps for the mobile platform alone. those are not the context of bullying. school life, school, peer life, peer relations. that's the concept of bullying whether it's bullying or cyber bullying and this blame the new thing that's come along because we don't fully understand it because we kind of don't like it, or it's a waste of time for kids and all of those things are understandable and we blame what we don't understand, but kids love the media and it's time to start the understanding and understanding that these media are totally blended into their lives. it's not an alternate reality or something separate or add on that the school and the school context is what we're really talking about here and that is 90% of their waking hours. that's their social life. >> and one of the reasons that a lot of researchers and nonprofits don't like the term "cyber bull" and it's about the technology but not the behavior itself. we don't actually use the world cyber bullying. we
remarkable and couragous people at work, local law enforcement, local da's, people who are getting out of their lanes. the old paradigm of a da and a attorney and a police officer, you get bad guys, you put them this jail. you know, i'm telling you, i've done a lot of hate crimes cases and i know today's bullies are often tomorrow's civil rights defendants. if we simply wait for that train wreck to occur and prosecute, that's going to be like trying to cure cancer by building more hospitals. we can't do it that way. we've got to get into prevention mode. we've got to figure out strategies to prevent, we've got to empower school districts, we've got to empower parents, we've got to empower bystanders. when my daughter was bullied in 7th grade, her friends saw it, but they were paralyzed. they didn't know what to do and they did nothing. i don't begrudge thipl for that, they are wonderful kids, but they didn't have the tools to do anything about it. so we work on those issues and we work on those and our local school district was remarkable in their reaction. but in the work that
sent to me in law school when he was over there in the peace corps. chris wrote wonderful notes and told me when he went running in the village where he was staying, only to have locals come up beside him and say where is it, where did it go. where is what? your donkey. i don't have a donkey. >> why are you running? [ laughter] >> for exercise. >> exercise? are you nuts? if you want exercise, come work on my orchard, you crazy american. >> chris succeeded because he knew how to laugh at himself and relate to people around him. there are two more memories i want to share. one deals with government and jazz. chris always wanted to work for the state department. he always wanted to be involved in the foreign service. he took the foreign service exam when we were undergrads at cal. he came back the first time, pleased with results on the written but felt he didn't do so well on the orals. the question that seemed to trip him up and left him perplexed was the following. mr. stevens, please compare american government and jazz music. chris told us he didn't quite know how to handle th
with supreme court justice anthony kennedy. and then yale law professor talks about how president obama stance on same-sex marriage. this week on "newsmakers, "president of the service employees international union talks about what unions like the seiu are looking for in budget negotiations. can see "newsmakers" at 10:00 a.m. >> what about if the soviet union announces tomorrow but if we attack cuba, it is going to be nuclear war? >> serious things here, we're .oing to be uneasy p >> something may make these people should off. -- shoot it off. i would want to make my own people very alert. >> it is a fascinating moment. it is amazing that eisenhower tells him to have a people alert. of course people are alert. kennedy laps. then he says, -- laughs. then he says, hang on tight. they're able to joke a little bit with each other. especially during this crisis, the had a sense of how lonely it is to occupy that office and i were getting all kinds of a device, good advice, a lot of faulty advice, which kennedy was. eisenhower knew all about faulty military advice. he is able to speak with supreme a
for 35 years. he was the president back then, too, of the harvard law review. we had -- we are used to holding the reins of power. a chief justice also holds the reins of power. the only difference is that a chief justice must hold them lightly, lest he discovered they are not allowed the -- attached to anything. nevertheless, i know some long and personal experience that david brings to rice, a special vision, telecom and leadership. this school is fortunate to have him at the helm, and i know he feels blessed to be here. i am pleased that they invited me to visit rice as part of the centennial celebration of the university's foundation, and i extend my sincere congratulations to the trustees, the faculty, students, and alumni on your first great century. the founding of a new university is always an historic occasion, but the founding ceremony for rice was truly extraordinary. i went back to read the newspaper accounts from october, 1912, that recorded the event. the papers reported that the distinguished first president of rice invited 150 pronounced scholars from around the worl
's not just the fiscal cliff coming on january 1st, more of the president's health care law is starting to kick in. how much more will you be paying? we're going to find out. hmm, it says here that cheerios helps lower cholesterol as part of a heart healthy diet. that's true. ...but you still have to go to the gym. ♪ the one and only, cheerios ..is bigger than we think ... sometimelike the flu.fer from with aches, fever and chills- the flu's a really big deal. so why treat it like it's a little cold? there's something that works differently than over-the-counter remedies. prescription tamiflu attacks the flu virus at its source. so don't wait. call your doctor right away. tamiflu is prescription medicine for treating the flu in adults and children one year and older whose flu symptoms started within the last two days. before taking tamiflu tell your doctor if you're pregnant, nursing. have serious health conditions, or take other medicines. if you develop an allergic reaction, a severe rash, or signs of unusual behavior, stop taking tamiflu and call your doctor immediately. children a
of the president's health more of the president's health care law is starting to kick [ malannouncer ] it'that time of year again. time for cii price rewind. because your daughter really wants that pink castle thing. and you really don't want to pay more than you have to. only citi price rewind automatically searches for the lowest price. and it finds one, you get refunded the difference. just use your citi card and register your purchase online. have a super sparkly day! ok. [ male announcer ] now all you need is a magic carriage. citi price rewind. buy now. save later. ♪ [ male announcer ] they are a glowing example of what it means to be the best. a at this special time of year, they shine even brighter. come to the winter event and get the mercedes-benz you've always wished for, now for an exceptional price. [ santa ] ho, ho, ho, ho! [ male announcer lease a 2013 glk350 for $399 a month at your local mercedes-benz dealer. log on to foxnews.com. ♪ >> well, the election is over and the white house is putting out new rules for the health care law, one is telling how to reward workers for liv
's time to get to work. it's pretty clear that the president was re-elected. obama care is the law of the land. >> i'm reasonable. i'm responsible. obama care's the law of the land. now, there's a guy the president can work with, right? wrong. politico says that boehner's opening offer to the president is to keep the bush tax cuts, cut entitlements, and postpone cuts to the pentagon. in other words, they haven't budged at all. how is that compromise? how is that reasonable? but it gets worse. speaker boehner now says the health care law should go under the knife. boehner says, quote, we can't afford it. we can't afford to leave it in tact. that's why i've been clear that the law has to stay on the table as both parties discuss ways to solve our nation's massive debt challenge. folks, this debate is over. the american people have spoken. mitt romney ran on two big ideas in this campaign. cut the taxes and reveal our obama care. he lost. those ideas lost. but they didn't learn a thing. joining me now is congressman keith ellison, democrat for minnesota. he's co-chair of the progressi
. military, intelligence, diplomatic, law enforcement, economic, and above all, the power of our values as americans. i kinda has sought to operate in areas beyond the reach of affective security and governance -- al qaeda has sought to operate in areas beyond the reach of the effective security in governance. they are now seeking to take a vantage of the transition to gain new sanctuary and incite violence. know that al qaeda and its affiliates are looking to establish a foothold in other countries in the middle east and africa, including the group in nigeria. the international community and our regional partners share our alcern about molali, where qaeda affiliated groups have taken hold in the north. we are also concerned about libya. with respect to the attack, let me be clear. we will work with the libyan government to bring to justice those who perpetrated the attacks. to protect americans at home and overseas, we need to continue to pursue al qaeda wherever they seek to hide. we must be constantly vigilant. we must be constantly determined to pursue this enemy, but what will it t
're not impeding traffic or doing anything else to violate the law, there's no problem here. >> an interesting story. and that is it. from cnn world headquarters in atlanta, i'm martin savidge. atlanta, i'm martin savidge. have a good night. -- captions by vitac -- www.vitac.com >>> this is a drug overdose call. >> every 19 minutes in the united states, someone dies of an accidental overdose. >> this is crazy. not a single solitary one of these people has to die. >> we are used to think of it starting here, looking like this but something happened in this country. and now, increasingly, it starts here, in your own home. >> as we speak, someone is dying, right now. >> and over the next hour, three people will die. >> he went to sleep and he had no idea this was gonna be his last night on earth. >> from misusing perfectly legal prescription drugs. taking a deadly dose. >> poise center, this is debra. >> i'm a little concern had that may have taken something that wasn't good for me on accident. [ phone ringing ] >> i took a few methadone from my grandpa. they were 10 milligrams. >> what you are l
of cases he mentions jefferson was a good master and jefferson's son-in-law, who ran things around here when jefferson was away, was in charge, kind of an accident overseer. colonel randolph and going through the records i found that colonel randolph when he was strapped for cash, took isaac's daughter, maria and salted -- soldier to an overseer who took the young girl away to kentucky and she was never seen again. now, isaac did mention that in his memoir. why? i really don't know. maybe he told his interviewer and the interviewer to want to write it down. maybe isaac did what to say anything about hurt feelings of a white. maybe it hasn't left an impression on you just don't know and it leads like you guys had a lot of music that we really don't know and that the psychological, possible psychological distortions that took place under slavery is something we are still wrestling with. another person's memoirs are spent a lot of time with were those of peter fossae. he left to memoirs. he gave new super entities in the late 1800 -- 1800s rather. he was born here and was one of the slaves
present member dhaka by law. it's a great pleasure to be reviewed. i feel so happy. thank you for your hospitality. this is my first visit as the president-elect of mexico, and i also want to congratulate you for your victory last november 6th for your second term as president to the united states and we wish you great success. i know you have a great task before you but i trust that you will be doing a wonderful job and i also want to thank you, president obama for having the vice president joe biden were go to mexico for the inaugural ceremony next saturday december 1st. i feel so pleased to be able to have the vice president biden represent you in mexico, and of course we are waiting for you in the delegation. >> [speaking in native tongue] the >> this is an opportunity we only have every 12 years. you will be starting your next four year term. i will be starting a six year administration in mexico as you know and i think this is a great opportunity for all of us to have a closer link of brotherhood and sisterhood and collaboration and of course of great accomplishments we might hav
for the president's health care law to be part of the fiscal talks. the white house told the "huffington post" the president opposes that. joining me now from washington, nbc white house correspondent kristen welker and neil irwin. welcome to both of you. happy holiday. >> happy holidays, alex. >> kristen, politico said the negotiations are off to a rough start. what do you see as the likelihood of a deal before the end of the year? >> alex, i think they are off to a relatively rough start. president obama expected to invite congressional leaders back to the white house next week after the holiday, but it seems at this point aides are trying to hammer out the beginnings of the deal. republicans seem to be digging in their heels on the issue of taxes, saying they don't want to see the bush era tax cuts expire for the wealthiest americans. of course, that is something the democrats have been adamant about. so they're stuck on this old issue of taxes. and also stuck on the issue of entitlements. we had harry reid come out and basically say he wasn't open to reforming especially social security.
. >>> on december 19, 2011, benjamin gupta, a law and mba student at george washington university died suddenly. mysteriously. he's no relationship to me, but when his family got word, they spent hours trading phone calls. they were in stunned disbelief. >> there was a message from his mom, and she had left three messages for me so i knew there was something wrong. >> i received a call from my mom. i didn't answer but then i got a text message from her, which is very unusual. >> and i called her back. and i said, what happened? and she says, it's ben. he died. i just didn't have any of the information. >> i finally said, how did this happen? and she said he went to sleep the night before and he just never woke up. >> he's always smiling, every picture he's smiling. >> for day ben gupta's family was desperate for answers. what killed him? he was only 28 years old. he had recently been given a clean bill of health. how could he just not wake up? >> and then the thought went through my mind that maybe it was some sort of a brain aneurism or something must have happened. >> but his father was in fo
who makes the laws. caller: president obama could not put anything in there before his term going out. i have been following this for years. usually the incoming president has bills that the previous president left. on this president's way out, congress would not let him put any deals in. they put enough in there to finish his term. host: the president has been reelected and will be back in next year. but i appreciate the call. i want to point to an obituary in the new york times today on the death of warren redmon. he dies at age 82. the sometimes combative centrist republican senator from new hampshire. you will be seeing those obituaries in several papers today. coming up next, a top supreme court reporter david savage will join us to talk about some of that the-profile cases an accord will be taking up. and later, phyllis bennis will take a closer look at where u.s. troops are deployed around the world, and not just in the middle east. first, turning back to warren rudman. he was a moderate republican senator from new hampshire. he was 82 years old when he died. he sat down with c
was a good master and that jefferson's son-in-law who ran things around here when jefferson was away, cornel raldolf was in charge he was an executive overseer. he was a good master. it in going through the record i found that he -- when he was strapped for cash, took isaac's daughter and sold him to overseer who took the young girl away to kentucky and she was never seen again. now, isaac didn't mention that in his memoir, why? i really don't know. maybe he told his white interviewer and the interviewer didn't want to write it down. maybe isaac didn't want to say anything that would hurt the feelings of a white man. maybe it didn't -- maybe it hasn't left my impression. we don't know. it's not there. it leads one to realize that there is a lot in these accounts that we really don't know, and that the psychology possible distortion that took place under slavery that we are still wrestling with. another person's memoir who i spent a lot of time with was peters to et. he left two memoirs he gave newspaper interviews in the late 1800s. he was born here and he was one of the slaves who was aucti
bazell, nbc news, new york. >>> up next here tonight, the actual research about getting along with the in-laws. >>> veteran new yorkers didn't know what they were looking at last night. a lot of them were worried someone had gone and tarted up the dignified empire state building. it was the first display of a new array of lights at the very top of what is still the grand master of the new york skyline. last night's show was coordinated to an alicia keys song. the owners of the building say they'll use the new led lights to display various light patterns from now on. we'll be watching. >>> one of the most influential figures in american sports has died. marvin miller never played major league baseball, but he changed the game nonetheless. when he took the job as leader of the major league players union in 66, the minimum salary back then was $6,000, and the owners had all the power. by 1982, when he retired, the union was one of the strongest in the u.s. the average player's salary was almost a quarter million dollars. the players had won free agency. he was by any standard a game changer. marv
-five minutes chief justice john roberts and the supreme court and constitutional law. after that, part of our coverage of the halifax international security forum, including a look at the u.s. role in global politics and the situation in syria. several live events tell you about tomorrow morning. former florida governor jeb bush will be speaking at the foundation for excellence in education. you can once that event here on c-span2 at 845 eastern. just after that at 9:00 a.m. eastern on c-span three the foreign policy initiative begins a daylong symposium on foreign policy. such a look at congress, national security was arizona senator john kyl. then on c-span, a forum on energy policy hosted by the bipartisan policy center. former senators and byron dorgan. that is at 10:00 a.m. eastern. >> on 16 of 17 bases in the united states we have military-run schools. the average cost to educate a child in that school per year is $50,000. almost four times what the rest of public education costs. and the vast majority of our bases use public schools. we could take the money we're spending today, pay ev
. on the other hand are social and law and order conservatives who are concerned about preserving america's unique culture and social order. to these conservatives, the presence of large numbers of people in the united states in violation of american law is inherently problematic. what's more, many of them aren't wild about the influx of large numbers of legal immigrants either, arguing that any culture needs sufficient time for new arrivals to assimilate and that cultures can benefit from periodic pauses in immigration. now, there's some other camps as well. for example, moral and social conservatives such as some in the catholic church and other religious groups who favor what might be called a light touch approach to immigration on what they believe are social justice grounds. but the broader point is there is a deep tension and division on the right on immigration, and there has been for decades now. now, the recent presidential election has brought the immigration issue once again to the center of american politics. governor mitt romney received a small percentage of latino and asian
not the sole spokesperson certainly those policies of welfare reform law and order they have been demagogue when nixon says law-and-order we know what he talks about. those were reagan and bush and rudy guiliani bless his soul tens of thousands of black lives were saved when will fare was one of the reform to blacks of lives were saved in a different way law-and-order was so saved and bill clinton took credit for both. [laughter] and we have 12 years of paradise where i describe the many wonderful things that happened. people are not walking on eggshells is a more. people had to be worried you would innocently say a word then you would ruin your career, you'd be hated by all of humankind. that was after over at o.j.. changes are subtle but it was wonderful for race relations in america. and happened along time ago then comes the most liberal candidate as barack obama it is the two for. a liberal president and his critics by:the reese's. and now with the bombing it comes back. we're walking on eight shells. although not very delicately [laughter] hence my introduction of. [laughter] i am goi
will be able to push in islam influence, sharia law constitution. when he says the measures are temporary, it doesn't matter because temporary is the problem. right now the new constitution is being drafted, and the centrists, the moderates, the liberals, the coptic christians have all walked out because they see the muslim brotherhood running the whole show. and they are trying to sue through the courts to stop this process, of course morsi doesn't like that, that's why he's saying i am above the constitution. megyn: an islam-driven constitution, sharia law. they already have this president is of the muslim brotherhood which promised it would not run for the presidency. if hosni mubarak was ousted and they had real democracy in egypt that turned out to be completely untrue. now we have morsi there and i want to ask you, ralph, the stark contrast between where we are now and where we were back in february of 2011 when president obama, after the arab spring in egypt said this. >> the people of egypt have spoken. their voices have been heard, and egypt will never be the same. for egyptians
left a law practice about eight years ago to work in education. i didn't consider whether i would work for a for-profit or nonprofit. i thought i want to go someplace and make a difference. i want to be a part of the solution. i took a pay cut to do that. people at learn it, i hard to hear quotes like that immediately for-profit is only stakeholder is the vest are tore or stockholder. for us at learn it we talk about we two bottom lines. we have an academic bottom line and financial bottom line and we can't fail on either. so we're very focused on student achievement and focused on making sure we're meeting the needs of those stakeholders which are the students, the families, the schools, the principals that we serve. so unfortunately i can't answer that exact question but i have to tell you we're here in this business because we want to make a difference and we're passionate about education. >> michael? to the point raquel just made, a skeptic of for-profits being involved in education, might say, well that is nice, if your heart is in the right place, okay but at the end of the day,
for an hour with students about the supreme court and constitutional law. [applause] >> thank you very much. thank you, and thank you, david, for that gracious introduction, and all of you for a very, very warm welcome. this is my first visit to rice, and i'm already glad that i came. president lee told you i can't talk about anything current, future, or past. [laughter] my remarks will be brief. [laughter] i had the pleasure of knowing david for 35 years. as he mentioned, he was the president back then too of the harvard law review. he's used to holding the reigns of power. a chief justice also holds the reigns of power. the only difference is that a chief justice has to hold them lightly, less he discover they are not attached to anything. [laughter] perhaps a faculty feels the same way about a university president. [laughter] nevertheless, i know from long and personal experience that david brings to light a special vision, talent, and leadership. this school is fortunate to have him at the helm, and i know he feels blessed to be there. i'm especially pleased that david invited me to vis
that i'll be honest, it's, i know the law and i know the rights and i've done everything in accordance to the law for that reason, for my own protection. but it is something that i do. i'm a little worried about. but, you know, the importance of what we're seeing is so important that i feel like risks have to be made. i have to do this. and i'm sorry, what was the other question? >> where does this go from here? obviously, it's been something the labor movement and workers inside stores and a whole bunch of people have been trying to build worker power inside walmart for a long time. and walmart has been very clever and deft at avoiding any kind of concentrated labor power. and i wonder what you see as the next step. >> well, just from the success of our actions yesterday and we're going to continue building this thing, continue the discussion with other workers, other associates. and, you know, again, we keep asking the company to just come to the table and talk with us about problems. and if they continue to avoid talking to us, dismissing their employees, dismissing those w whose fa
, there are people who fear islamic law, there are people who want the old days to come back and hosni mubarak, so, it's a really mixed bag of protesters and the question is, will they have-- will they have the momentum and the willpower to keep coming out day after day and able to stick around, rick? >> steve harrigan streaming live from cairo, thank you very much. >> get some background on president morsi's rise to power. he was elected in 2012 with a strong mandate winning more than 51% of the vote, as leader of the muslim brotherhood, he was the first islamist elected to be head of an arab state. from the outset morsi had been plagued with allegations that his party wanted to be in the political landscape and a moral code based on strict islamic principles. >> there are signs that things are beginning to get back to normal as israel begins to ease border restrictions into gaza after a cease-fire agreement with hamas the other day and that ended eight days of cross border fighting which claimed the lives of 166 palestinians and six israeli civilians. as part of a truce brokered by egypt israel
the election, many republicans admitting obamacare is the law of the land, but did they speak too soon? there's big healthcare law news tonight, and that is next. in two minutes, it's happening again. but this time it's not charlie sheen ranting against "two and a half men." which of the show's stars is now telling viewers stop watching. you'll see for yourself two minutes away. before copd... i took my son fishing every year. we had a great spot, not easy to find, but worth it. but with copd making it hard to breathe, i thought those days might be over. so my doctor prescribed symbicort. it helps significantly improve my lung function starting within five minutes. symbicort doesn't replace a rescue inhaler for sudden symptoms. with symbicort, today i'm breathing better. and that means...fish on! symbicort is for copd including chronic bnchitis and emphysema. it should not be taken more than twice a day. symbirt may increase your risk of lung infections, osteoporosis, d some eye problems. tell your doctor if you have a heart condition or high blood pressure before taking it. with copd, i thou
the law. they changed the law so that only a special election could fill a vacant seat. until then, the seat would have to be empty. mitt romney tried to veto that new law. but the legislature overrode his veto, thereby stripping mitt romney of his power to choose a replacement. that became a mute point because john kerry didn't win so he stayed on as senator. but then fast forward fife years. 2009. new president barack obama, the country embroiled in a big debate over national health reform. those against it were against it to the point of rage. and those wo who wanted it were excited to be on the cusp of achieving something they had failed to achieve for decades. at the time the democrat hs a majority in the united states senate, 60 seats is a filibuster super majority. that's enough to pass health reform. that majority for the democrats included senator ted kennedy. senator kennedy spent his career trying to pass health reform. it was his life's work. he had done it at the state level with that guy, mitt romney. he had led on the issue nationally for decades. it was his signatur
father-in-law is in chinatown sro, too. my father-in-law's building had this bed bug infestation. when he goes to bed, all the bed bugs come out at night. so he got bitten pretty badly all over the neck, the head. he reported to the manager. the manager just did a real routine thing about the bed bugs. so my father-in-law went to chinatown cdc for help. so that was brought to the attention of the health department. so he couldn't even sleep well at night. so we are really hopeful that the legislation will help people to understand how they are treated and get better. we are living in a pretty bad situation once you have bed bugs. so we hope that we could get this legislation done really fast, so things will get better for us. we thank the supervisors to put such an emphasis on improving the environment for us. thank you. >> thank you. i'm going to call up a couple more name cards. [ reading speakers' names ] >> good afternoon supervisors, thank you, my name is jorge potio, a lifetime resident of san francisco and i want to start by recognizing the hard work that has been put into the
borrowed and spent all the program surplus revenues from years past, which by law congress now has to pay back. adding to the deficit. >> the money came in. congress spent it. look here, we have money to spend. let's go ahead and spend it up. there it went. it's gone. >> social security now needs to start getting the money back again adds to the deficit. just this year alone, the social security trustees' report that "in 2012, the projected difference between social security's dedicated tax income and expenditures is $165 billion." part of the $165 billion added to the deficit, $112 billion of it is a result of the payroll tax cut that president obama pushed through, which by law congress also had to restore to the trust fund. all points republicans emphasize in the current talks. >> why in the world would they want to talk about the fact that vital program started spending out more than it took in, in 2010, for the first time in 30 years? >> shortal in social security eventually reaches hundreds of billions a year. but some changes now would help reducing the benefits for the wealthy or
to january 12012. tom: are you serious? did just passed a tax law that will go back to the beginning of the year? >> absolutely right. property is retroactive. the tax part of it is retroactive to january 1st 2012. the money generated from that goes to solidify the pesions of the teachers. it does not go to the schools at all. these are the games the democrats played day in, day out, wheeher it's california or waington d.c. tom: well, there have been some people lately that have been talking about one prominent publisher from weekly standard, bill kristol. they have been playing that over and over again. you know, after all i guess tea party people and everybody else and not too concerned about raising taxes on millionaires because half of them live in hollywood. are they goin to --it seems like some people on the ride are starting to talk about raising taxes. >> well, certainly - listen, you can't sit and raise taxes on everybody ele just to get back in hollywood. half of hollywood goes to monaco. you don't have to pay taxes. en head of facebook gave up his citizenship. democrats, i
passed a tax law that will go back to the beginning of the year? >> absolutely right. property is retroactive. the tax part of it is retroactive to january 1st 2012. the money generated from that goes to solidify the pensions of the teachers. it does not go to the schools at all. these are the games the democrats played day in, day out, wheeher it's california or washington d.c. tom: well, there have been some people lately that have been talking about one prominent publisher from weekly standard, bill kristol. they have been playing that over and over again. you know, after all i guess tea party people and everybody else and not too concerned about raising taxes on millionaires because half of them live in hollywood. are they going to -- it seems like some people on the ride are starting to talk about raising taxes. >> well, certainly -- listen, you can't sit and raise taxes on everybody else just to get back in hollywood. half of hollywood goes to monaco. you don't have to pay taxes. then head of facebook gave up his citizenship. democrats, i don't know any republicans who ha
that the seattle law is consistent with the first amendment. and, colleagues, i also want to mention that i'm still committed to finding policies that reduce yellow page blight and i'm working with the city attorney to hopefully draft new legislation to find alternate approaches to achieving the same goal. at this time, colleague, i hope you will be able to support this legislation in light of the 9th circuit. >> thank you. thank you, president chiu. supervisor wiener. >> i thank you and i want to thank president chiu for having pursued this legislation which i was happy to support and i was really saddened by the ninth slur circuit ruling. it seems that our federal courts more and more are fetishizing commercial and corporate speech. i fundamentally disagree with that. with that said, the current law is what it is and i will be reluctantly supporting this suspension and hope to revive legislation in the not too distant future. >> thank you. let's open this up for public comment. is there anyone from the public that would like to speak? seeing none, public comment is closed. so, r colleagues, there
directfully congress. members of the house and senate have their own constituencies. >> if states have laws enabling the online and catalog retailers to collect state sales tax voluntarily. the next section could rewrite the rules on ecommerce. >> the federal government says u.s. and other nations seized 132 domain names that were selling counterfeit merchandise. ice officials say the website duped consumers to buying bogus items. syria used distraction of fighting between israel and palestinians to resupply government troops in syria. correspondent leland vittert has the evidence. >> bretevidence >> reporter: they have been firing off and appearing ready for battle. the western intelligence sources tell fox news the men are ire rainian revolutionary guard troops coming to help bashar assad in the syria long civil war. they have exploited the attention on syria to ramp up the flight. often sending ton of ammunition, weapon and equipment multiple times a week. they are flying via rocky air space. the u.s. put pressure on iraq. iraq is inspecting the planes but sources say it's done on the re
invasion under the common law -- >> it isn't the sniffing in the abstract, it's the sniffing at this point. the sniffing at a person's front door, right? >> well, i mean, that's true, your honor, but i think if it wasn't a search for the police officer to walk up there and sniff and report smelling live marijuana, then it wasn't a search when frankie walked up there and alerted to the presence of an illegal narcotic. >> well, i didn't say it wouldn't be a search if the police officer himself did that if he went there with the intention of smelling at the door. he's going there to search, and he shouldn't be on the -- [inaudible] to search. >> i think it's been conceded in this case, at least it was below, that the officer could walk up there, report the smell of marijuana and that that was not a search. >> mr. garre, this is what we said, and i'm just going to read it. we said: we think that obtaining by sense-enhancing technology any information regarding the interior of the home that could not otherwise have been obtained without physical intrusion into a constitutionally-protected area
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